Site update

Volume 11, issue #9 is now out on stands. We’ve added three stories to the “Students” page of the Features section, a Baseball/Softball update under “Sports,” a new Column under “Opinion,” two news stories on the front page and one article on the “Dance” page.

Issue #10 will be our last paper of the semester, you can expect to see it on stands in early May.

Health Center offers seasonal flu shots

By Cecilia Jordan

Many students will be familiar with the Health Services building, which is located in the parking lot next to the police station.

Many students will be familiar with the Health Services building, which is located in the parking lot next to the police station.

As a student, staying healthy is a full time job. We are in the public all day, around all sorts of people, and germs spread like wildfire. Missing one day of class due to sickness can potentially put a student behind the rest of the class by a week. However, since a lot of the student population has no insurance, staying healthy is more of a wish than an expectation. For COM students looking for low cost medical options, the health center located just off of parking lot 6 next to the police station might be a good place to start.

There are many services offered by licensed health care workers for a small fee and some even for free. Students can take advantage of speaking with a medical doctor or nurse when they have concerns about their health. If a student is sick or hurt on campus, the health center can also either treat them or assist in getting the help they need. The clinic also offers low cost medications, screening tests such as blood or pregnancy and immunizations for conditions such as Tetanus, Hepatitis or the flu shot.

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The aftermath of war: On the 10th anniversary of the invasion of Iraq

By Nash Kurilko

Jake Velloza, a former student at College of Marin, was buried in Olema Cemetery four years ago this May. He was shot and killed while serving in Iraq.

Jake Velloza, a former student at College of Marin, was buried in Olema Cemetery four years ago this May. He was shot and killed while serving in Iraq.

PART ONE OF TWO

Just over 10 years ago, U.S.-led Coalition troops poured into Iraq, overrunning the Baathist army and deposing longtime dictator Saddam Hussein. Many disaffected Iraqis rebelled against the occupation force, some using the chaos to launch attacks on rival ethnic or religious groups. The ensuing intractable conflict reached a peak in 2007 in the form of a virtual civil war. In response to the violence, then-President George W. Bush ordered a troop ‘surge’—a massive influx of fresh U.S. soldiers to help secure and rebuild the war-ravaged country.

Two years later, on May 2, 2009, a 22 year-old Inverness, West Marin County native, former College of Marin student and U.S. Army soldier named Jacob Robert Velloza was killed in action in the Iraqi city of Mosul. His death was one of 4,486 U.S. military fatalities in Iraq between March 2003 and December 2011. More than 100,000 people were killed in Iraq from March 2003 to April 2009, according to the Associated Press.

The war came after a dozen years of stringent sanctions imposed on Iraq in the aftermath of the 1991 Gulf War. Many Western intelligence agencies suspected Hussein’s government possessed weapons of mass destruction acquired or produced in the 1980s, such as Sarin gas, nerve gas, and other chemical and biological agents. Throughout the mid-to-late 1990s international inspectors toured Iraq and found  no evidence of WMD production in the country.

Then came the horrifying terrorist attacks of September 11 2001, which heralded the beginning of the War on Terror. The nation grieved for its losses, and sought revenge. In October 2001, the U.S. invaded Afghanistan, ejected the Taliban government, occupied the cities and continued to hunt Osama Bin Laden.

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