When ‘male’ or ‘female’ isn’t enough

Panel on transgender and intersex issues

By Chandra Smith

Transgender student Selena Xochitl Martinez, and her daughter Lorena Lua Martinez.

Transgender student Selena Xochitl Martinez, and her daughter Lorena Lua Martinez.

The Panel: A typical day for most: wake up and get dressed in clothing that is perceived as appropriate for your gender, conduct your daily business while being both addressed and treated as the gender you identify with on the inside, and go to bed. . . All without really having to think about your gender at all.

Imagine if the world constantly referred to you and treated you as a gender other than the one that you identify with. That used to be student Selena Martinez’s experience. Assigned a gender determination of “boy” at birth, it was a jolt to learn that she was seen as different from the other little girls she was used to playing with.

“I think it was when I was told to start playing like a boy, and I wasn’t allowed to play with my cousins, my girl cousins. We were very close,” Martinez says. She had no idea she was considered “other” than she experienced herself, until her uncle told her to “man up” when she was a small child. She was told to play ball and to stop playing with jump ropes.
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Sorting out COM’s recycling mess

By Roddy Heckelman

Regardless of the recycling labels on the bins, anything in a black plastic bag goes to the landfilll according to the Marin Sanitary Service, which empties COM’s dumpsters.

Regardless of the recycling labels on the bins, anything in a black plastic bag goes to the landfilll according to the Marin Sanitary Service, which empties COM’s dumpsters.

Recycling has become part of the routine when taking out the trash. It is so ingrained in our society that we have recycling bins, and even separate receptacles with dividers for plastic, aluminum, and paper or cardboard recycling.

We all try to do it. The reasons are obvious. Landfills are at their limit, trash abounds, and we need to reuse products and materials to keep our landfills from overflowing. More importantly recycling protects our environment from becoming further polluted. If we all know that recycling is in everyone’s best interest, then why don’t we do it at College of Marin?
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