Pete Carroll: From Mariner to Seahawk

Super Bowl coach set his goals at College of Marin

By Kyle Kelly and Max Wolf-Johnson

Seattle’s Pete Carroll celebrates after his Seahawks won the Super Bowl with a dominating win over Denver.

Seattle’s Pete Carroll celebrates after his Seahawks won the Super Bowl with a dominating win over Denver.

 

Pete Carroll: Super bowl champion, former 49ers defensive coordinator, and College of Marin graduate. It has been over four decades since the boyishly cheerful head coach of the Seattle Seahawks attended school here at College of Marin.

Born in 1951 in San Francisco and raised in Greenbrae, Carroll found an early love for sports. Later, as a student athlete at Redwood High School in Larkspur, he played basketball, baseball, and football.

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The latest form of addiction: TV binge watching

Sleepless students binge on Netflix series

By Chandra Smith

 

Jesse Pinkman (Aaron Paul) and Walter White (Bryan Cranston) appeared in an ad promoting their often binged series “Breaking Bad,” which ended last September.

Jesse Pinkman (Aaron Paul) and Walter White (Bryan Cranston) appeared in an ad promoting their often binged series “Breaking Bad,” which ended last September.

 

Type the word “binge” into the Google search bar, and “binge watching” is the first term offered. Enter the phrase “binge watching” into the field, and the first few options are: “binge watching TV,” “binge watching Netflix,” “binge watching House of Cards,” or “binge watching Breaking Bad.”

Netflix has effectively inducted a new remote social event into our already media-saturated society. Like broadcast sports, holidays, and huge media events, we can participate in the activity solo, or in a group.

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Campus kidnapper still at large

By R.J. Heckelman

An unidentified person kidnapped and sexually assaulted a COM student at gunpoint.

An unidentified person kidnapped and sexually assaulted a COM student at gunpoint.

It’s been almost three weeks since a student was allegedly kidnapped at gunpoint, forced to drive to another location, and sexually assaulted. So far there have been no new leads or arrests in the case. The incident, which occurred at 8:15 Thursday night, January 23rd in the gravel parking lot, behind the portable village, remains a mystery.

A man reportedly was waiting for the student in the back seat of his car. After the student entered the vehicle, the assailant informed him that he had a gun, and forced him to drive to a remote location in Tam Valley.
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What will happen to the media center?

By Brady Meyring

Nancy Kutcher, who runs the Media Center, is set to retire by the end of the month. Her absence leaves some uncertainty about the Media Center’s immediate future.

Nancy Kutcher, who runs the Media Center, is set to retire by the end of the month. Her absence leaves some uncertainty about the Media Center’s immediate future.

When speaking about her 15-year career at the College of Marin, Nancy Kutcher’s passion for helping students is clearly evident. What is unclear is exactly what will happen to the Media Center after she leaves. She is set to retire on December 31st of this year. According to VP of Student Services, Jonathan Eldridge, “[Kutcher’s] position will not be filled, at least not in the short term.” The most likely scenario is that the Media Center computers and other resources will be moved into the library.

Eldridge says that the process of moving the Media Center, if it goes through, will not be completed by the start of Spring semester but should be done soon thereafter.

The Media Center, on the top floor of the Learning Center Building, offers 18 computers networked to printers for student use. Many of these computers are loaded with specialized software that students need for certain classes. In addition, teachers often place DVDs and other media on reserve in the Center for students to access. Kutcher is present to manage the Center and help students troubleshoot issues with the Microsoft Office suite, printers and other equipment.
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Hoop Dreams: Congolese star basketball player looks ‘forward’ to his role

By Shirley Beaman

Stan Kaya points to the spot on the globe where his country is located. Marin County is 8,725 miles from his home, the Republic of the Congo in equitorial Africa.

Stan Kaya points to the spot on the globe where his country is located. Marin County is 8,725 miles from his home, the Republic of the Congo in equitorial Africa.

International student Stan Kaya will never forget the day rebel soldiers came knocking at his door.  He was only 5 years old at the time. What started off like any other evening with his family would quickly turn into the most terrifying night of his young life.

The pounding at the front door that night was so loud it startled the whole family, with the exception of his father, who was napping in a back room.

As Kaya’s mother hurriedly crossed the living room to open the door, the shouting became louder and more urgent. It seemed as if the door would bust open at any moment.

Even at his age, Kaya knew that his country, the Republic of Congo, was in turmoil. There were powerful factions at odds with each other.  Boniface Kaya, his father, was a prominent physician, not only in his hometown, Dolisie, but throughout the Congo. As a supporter of former President Pascal Lissouba, who had been overthrown in a coup, Boniface was a target. Rebels were scouring the countryside for Lissouba sympathizers.

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COM Celebrates International Education Week

By Brady Meyring

COM President David Wain Coon congratulates Jason Lau, director of International Education, for overseeing the growth of the college’s International Student Program.

COM President David Wain Coon congratulates Jason Lau, director of International Education, for overseeing the growth of the college’s International Student Program.

With the flags of  34 nations forming a semi-circle on the lawn in front of the Student Services Building, COM President David Wain Coon stepped up to hit a giant gong and officially declare the opening of the college’s first International Education Week. The flags represent the nearly three dozen countries that COM’s 100 international students come from.

Approximately 75 guests attended the event, which signals the growing role that ethnic diversity plays at the college.

This  is a  breakout year for  International  Education at College of Marin. As recently as three years ago, programs for enhancing international student life and retention were sparse or non-existent. International students contributed to college life and academics but with little formal recognition or centralized support. There was also no office coordinating the effort to infuse global perspectives and intercultural exchange into post-secondary education at COM.

When Jason Lau was appointed  the director of International Education, in September 2011, all of that began to change.

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This land is not your land

Visitors, businesses and students affected by government shutdown

By Nash Kurilko

Point Reyes National Seashore was one of 59 national parks that were closed during the 16-day government shutdown. Public beaches like this one were off-limits to the public.

Point Reyes National Seashore was one of 59 national parks that were closed during the 16-day government shutdown. Public beaches like this one were off-limits to the public.

When the Republican-controlled House shut down the government, nobody knew how long it would last or what the immediate effects would be. It was only when 59 national parks across America began closing that most citizens—and tourists—realized the full ramifications of the shutdown.

Marin Headlands, Muir Woods National Monument, Bolinas Ridge, Stinson Beach, and Point Reyes National Seashore were among the Bay Area parks included in the closure. Of Marin’s 332,928 acres, 118,669 are parks, reservoirs, or conservation areas. When the national parks closed,  nearly 30 percent of Marin was off-limits to  the public.

The effect on local tourism was devastating. According to a February 2013 report issued by the National Park Service, Point Reyes, Muir Woods and the Golden Gate National Seashore generate $445 million a year in total revenue, and employ roughly 3,400 people.

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Miss California’s inspiration: IT’s Wendy Lee, mom extraordinaire

Miss California, Crystal Lee, who became the first runner up in the recent Miss America pageant, made numerous television appearances with her mom, Wendy Lee.

Miss California, Crystal Lee, who became the first runner up in the recent Miss America pageant, made numerous television appearances with her mom, Wendy Lee.

By Shirley Beaman

She flashes two thumbs up when she knows her daughter has nailed a performance.  It’s the special “signal” longtime College of Marin employee Wendy Lee gives her daughter, Crystal Lee, current Miss California and runner up to Miss America 2014.

“It has become something Crystal looks for when she’s onstage,” says Wendy.  “She always looks for me in the audience, she always knows where I am.”

It’s the kind of support you would expect from a mother who was named after two pageant queens in Taiwan, where Wendy Lee was born.  Her Chinese name, given to her by her father, is derived from the names of two women who were “beautiful on the inside and the outside.” It would prove to be a harbinger for Crystal’s success in the beauty pageant arena.

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Almost Miss America

COM alumna, Miss California, selected first runner-up

By Sophia DeFelice

Crystal Lee, our current Miss California, was first runner-up to becoming Miss America.

Crystal Lee, our current Miss California, was first runner-up to becoming Miss America.

They stand face-to-face, hands held tight, tensions mounting. Miss America 2014 is about to be crowned. The two finalists for America’s premier pageant hug each other. And whisper in each other’s ear.

Miss California wears an elegant long-sleeved, full-length lilac evening gown. Her silver studded cuffs sparkle. Miss New York wears a bright yellow evening gown with a plunging V neckline.

They appear to be best friends. The TV camera pans to the audience, where both sets of parents stand anxiously next to one another.

Chris Harrison, who also hosts “The Bachelor,” explains to viewers that the first runner up receives a $25,000 scholarship. And should anything happen to Miss America, the first runner up would carry out her duties.

Moments later, Harrison announces the winner – Miss New York, Nina Davuluri, the second year in a row that a contestant from the Empire State has won the competition.

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ASCOM election results a mixed bag

By Jim Gessner

Newly elected ASCOM President Steven Petker (right) outlines his agenda for fall 2013 during  an interview in the Echo Times offices as Jim Gessner (left) looks on.

Newly elected ASCOM President Steven Petker (right) outlines his agenda for fall 2013 during an interview in the Echo Times offices as Jim Gessner (left) looks on.

The headline could have read: “ASCOM election turnout unprecedented in recent memory,” or “Steven Petker wins ASCOM presidential election by huge margin”, or perhaps “voter turnout larger than expected.” Any number of things that, while factually correct, miss the point entirely. While 494 ballots cast was an unprecedented turnout in recent memory—last year only 176 votes were cast, it is an anemic count for a student body of 6,662.

Who’s to blame? We are. The students of College of Marin. The administration and faculty are not here to make us care about our future, they are here to give us the tools to make these decisions for ourselves. If we fail to use these tools, we have no one to blame but ourselves.

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