What will happen to the media center?

By Brady Meyring

Nancy Kutcher, who runs the Media Center, is set to retire by the end of the month. Her absence leaves some uncertainty about the Media Center’s immediate future.

Nancy Kutcher, who runs the Media Center, is set to retire by the end of the month. Her absence leaves some uncertainty about the Media Center’s immediate future.

When speaking about her 15-year career at the College of Marin, Nancy Kutcher’s passion for helping students is clearly evident. What is unclear is exactly what will happen to the Media Center after she leaves. She is set to retire on December 31st of this year. According to VP of Student Services, Jonathan Eldridge, “[Kutcher’s] position will not be filled, at least not in the short term.” The most likely scenario is that the Media Center computers and other resources will be moved into the library.

Eldridge says that the process of moving the Media Center, if it goes through, will not be completed by the start of Spring semester but should be done soon thereafter.

The Media Center, on the top floor of the Learning Center Building, offers 18 computers networked to printers for student use. Many of these computers are loaded with specialized software that students need for certain classes. In addition, teachers often place DVDs and other media on reserve in the Center for students to access. Kutcher is present to manage the Center and help students troubleshoot issues with the Microsoft Office suite, printers and other equipment.
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Incumbents re-elected, newcomer wins seat on Board of Trustees

By R.J. Heckelman and Andrew Lino

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From left to right: Brady Bevis, Diana Conti and Wanden Treanor

The Board of Trustees election wrapped up two weeks ago, with incumbent trustees Wanden Treanor and Diana Conti retaining their seats. The race between Barbara Dolan and newcomer Brady Bevis was tight, but in the end, Bevis pulled ahead with 21.3 percent of all tallied votes, compared to Dolan’s 20.5.

Previously, Bevis worked for the state Department of Labor, and before that, she practiced public interest law for 10 years. She also served on the Marin County Board of Supervisors after an election in 1990. After serving a successful term, she left politics temporarily to focus on starting the Bay Area Multimedia Partnership, or BAMP, at the request of the Bay Area Economic Forum. BAMP was a public-private partnership that operated between 1997 and 2000, designed to coordinate the Bay Area’s private industry leaders with the local schools and community colleges in order to better prepare prospective students for employment in the emerging digital industry.

When asked about the results of the election, Bevis said, “I’m overjoyed that over 20,000 people voted for change at COM, and I will work hard to make COM a better place for students and faculty alike.”

She ousted trustee veteran of 25 years, Barbara Dolan, joining the College of Marin board of trustees. Bevis plans to unite the college with the community in order to provide better job opportunities within the local job market.

This will be the first new trustee on the board in over five years, and a welcome change to the college. Dolan was not available for comment.

 

IVC’s organic farm offers nutritious alternatives

By Sophia DeFelice

Henry Wallace, who teaches organic farming classes at IVC, chats with Nanda Schorske, dean of the campus.

Henry Wallace, who teaches organic farming classes at IVC, chats with Nanda Schorske, dean of the campus.

If Marin County isn’t at the forefront of bringing organic foods to school children, it certainly is a contender now. The College of Marin has been leading the charge with its Novato-based organic farm, aimed at teaching children and adults alike about a lifestyle of healthy eating.

Nanda Schorske, Executive Dean of Indian Valley Campus and Workforce and Economic Development has been at COM for 8 years.  Schorske oversees the Organic Farm and Garden at IVC.

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Marshall Northcott remembered

By Leslie Lee

Marshall Northcott stands above a beach just  south of Pacifica on a clear, windy day last year.

Marshall Northcott stands above a beach just
south of Pacifica on a clear, windy day last year.

 

Marshall Northcott, director of the Information Technology Department, died on July 6 at his home in Hayward, California. The cancer that took him originated in his early thirties as a melanoma tumor on his leg. It took two operations to completely remove the tumor.  In the subsequent years before his death, Marshall received regular screening blood tests to ensure early treatment should the cancer return. His last blood test in February 2013 showed that he was clear. By the time he fell ill in late May, his doctors discovered that the cancer had metastasized to his brain. Prognosis was terminal. He spent his last days at home, comforted by his family, and the emails he received from the College of Marin staff.

Marshall started working for COM on April 1, 2010. In his role as the Director of the Information Technology Department, Marshall managed a staff of approximately sixteen to eighteen employees by himself until March 18, 2013, when Jeff Fleisher was hired as a supervisor.

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Miss California’s inspiration: IT’s Wendy Lee, mom extraordinaire

Miss California, Crystal Lee, who became the first runner up in the recent Miss America pageant, made numerous television appearances with her mom, Wendy Lee.

Miss California, Crystal Lee, who became the first runner up in the recent Miss America pageant, made numerous television appearances with her mom, Wendy Lee.

By Shirley Beaman

She flashes two thumbs up when she knows her daughter has nailed a performance.  It’s the special “signal” longtime College of Marin employee Wendy Lee gives her daughter, Crystal Lee, current Miss California and runner up to Miss America 2014.

“It has become something Crystal looks for when she’s onstage,” says Wendy.  “She always looks for me in the audience, she always knows where I am.”

It’s the kind of support you would expect from a mother who was named after two pageant queens in Taiwan, where Wendy Lee was born.  Her Chinese name, given to her by her father, is derived from the names of two women who were “beautiful on the inside and the outside.” It would prove to be a harbinger for Crystal’s success in the beauty pageant arena.

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President Coon on the state of the campus

By Kyle Dang

President Coon is optimistic about College of Marin’s future.

President Coon is optimistic about College of Marin’s future.

The College of Marin Spring 2013 semester is fast coming to an end, and the campus is still buzzing with activity.  Buildings all over the Kentfield campus are taped up, locked, and vacant. Teachers and staff are being moved from building to building, making it hard for them to settle down and focus on instructing students.  The College of Marin Foundation, an independent organization tied to COM dedicated to distributing scholarships and grants, recently had its board resign in its entirety. Their resignation was in protest of an audit that would eventually prove their mismanagement of over $400,000. And all of these troubles are exacerbated by the college’s redline budget, which has forced cuts to both credit course offerings and faculty.

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Students join protest against oil pipeline

February 25, 2013

By Kyle Dang

College of Marin professor Joe Mueller and members of the new Environmental Action Club show support for the movement against the KXL pipeline at a satellite protest in San Francisco.

College of Marin professor Joe Mueller and members of the new Environmental Action Club show support for the movement against the KXL pipeline at a satellite protest in San Francisco.

College of Marin students and instructors attended a satellite protest in support of an environmental movement to stop a cross-country natural gas pipeline on February 17. Sixteen members of the newly reformed Environmental Action Committee took the blank ferry to San Francisco and joined what one of the main organizers of the event, 350.org,  claimed was just under 5,000 people.  The San Francisco protest was part of a larger group of demonstrations happening across the nation.  Collectively, it was the largest climate rally in our nation’s history.  The primary reasoning for the protest is the fear that the pipeline will destroy local environments and poison the land surrounding it.

“It was my first protest.  I’ve never gone out and done something like this before,” said Elba Allen, a COM student and roster member of the EAC. “I’ve always wanted to, but it’s hard working and going to school.  It was nice to go out and do my part, and feel a part of the community.  It definitely had a positive impact on me.”

Other EAC members who attended the protest echoed the sentiment.

“I haven’t been to a protest in quite a few years and I forgot about the group camaraderie you feel with complete strangers.  It’s like cheering for a sports team,” said member Emily Wilson.

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